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Intravenous Management of Iron in Primary Care

Iron is an essential bioinorganic compound for the body to make Haemoglobin (Hb), a pigment that makes red blood cells red. Patient Blood Management (PBM) Guidelines recommend initiatives to optimise red blood cell mass and reduce the necessity for blood transfusion. PBM is the application of evidence based medical and surgical practices designed to prevent anaemia and decrease bleeding, and also to identify patients at risk of transfusion and provide a management plan aimed at reducing this need. When the amount of iron in the body gets to low, the haemoglobin level falls below normal. This is known as "iron deficiency". The problem also crosses disease boundaries with a high prevalence in chronic health conditions such as heart failure (up to 50%), renal failure and inflammatory bowel disease.

The Iron Infusion Clinic was as established as a response to a lack of intravenous service delivery within the community informed by the fact that Iron deficiency has been identified as a major health issue affecting all age groups and is commonly dealt with by GP referral to secondary and tertiary care. 

Treatment for Iron Deficiency

Anaemia is frequently caused by iron deficiency, which is associated when iron losses or requirements exceed absorption, and is often multifactorial. Most body iron (i.e. 2.6g of 3–4g) circulates as haemoglobin (Hb), which is recycled when red cells are no longer capable of dividing but are still alive. Symptoms of iron-deficiency anaemia observed frequently in general practice include chronic fatigue, headache, dizziness, breathlessness, and palpitations and reduced cognitive function. Irondeficiency anaemia may reduce the patient's health-related quality of life, physical performance and ability to work, and increase morbidity and mortality.

Treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia involves identifying and treating the cause of the condition, as well as replacing iron. Treatment with oral iron supplement products is a convenient, effective, inexpensive first-line therapy in many populations with iron-deficiency anaemia; however, such
formulations may not be suitable or effective in all patients, due to poor absorption and tolerability as oral iron can cause gastrointenstinal side effects.


To overcome these problems, a number of intravenous iron preparations have been used for the replacement of iron. At the Iron Infusion Clinic we deliver Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject®) as a complex of iron that allows for administration of a large replenishment dose (<=1000 mg of iron; maximum dose 15 mg/kg bodyweight per week) over a short infusion period. Arche Health has concluded that this is an efficient alternative for patients with iron deficiency in a primary care setting.

Therefore Iron Infusion Clinic is a multidisciplinary, standalone community based GP led services with dedicated nursing staff. The Service Model is based on Joanna Briggs Institute's approach to evidence-based healthcare which ensures clinical best practice guidance for intravenous iron infusion management.

Patient Referrals & Cost of Treatment

Patient referrals are accepted from GP’s and Hospitals throughout the Perth metropolitan and rural areas. Cost of treatment is $150. Medicare will refund $73.95, remainder amount goes to pay for consumables. 

Please fax all referrals on (08) 6253 2199 or email the referrals to admin@belhealth.com.au. For any enquiries regarding services please contact us on (08) 6253 2100

Referral Temaples [ pdf GP Referral ] [ pdf Hospital ][ Medical Director ] [ Best Practice ]. 
 

Clinic Location 

The Iron Infusion Clinic is located within the Belvidere Health Centre Complex at 39 Belvidere St, Belmont WA 6104.

Clinic Operating Hours. 

The clinic is open between 8:30am to 4:30pm Thursday's and Fridays.